Brooklyn: Kensington


KensingtonKensington is a neighborhood located in the borough of Brooklyn, New York. The neighborhood is primarily a residential area consisting of housing types that run the scale from brick row houses, to detached one family Victorians, and apartment buildings. It chooses to specialize in this aspect of life, rather than waste effort and resources on anything else. It is entirely dedicated to ensuring that people can live well and in peace.

Kensington is in the south of Prospect Park and the Green-Wood Cemetery which is bounded by Coney Island Avenue to the east, Caton Avenue/ Ft. Hamilton Parkway to the north, 36th St to the west, and 18th Avenue to the south. The surrounded neighborhoods are Ditmas Park, and Prospect Park South to the east, Windsor Terrace to the north, Borough Park to the west, and Parkville to the south.

As of 2010 census, there were 50,397 people residing in the area. The median income for a household in the village is $42,498. The latitude of Kensington is 40.646N. The longitude is -73.971W. It is in the Eastern Standard time zone. Elevation is 46 feet.

In 1737, the area was settled by Edgar the Duke of Kensington (originally colonized by Dutch farmers). His farmhouse was near present-day Cortelyou Road & East 3rd Street. It was once a small stone house which was gone by 1893. The community was named after a village in England at the turn of the century and developed in 1885 after the completion of Ocean Parkway. The Parkway was finished in 1876 and features six miles of landscaped malls, benches, chess tables and walking and biking paths, linking Prospect Park, and now part of the Brooklyn-Queens Expressway. It is also known in experienced circles for one-bedroom homes at less than $ one hundred thousand. Many establishments built in the 1920s which attracted Italian and Irish immigrants to the neighborhood.

Kensington is a sort of United Nations with their residents came from all the continents. Most of them are Ukrainian, South Asian (Bangladeshi and Pakistani), Chinese, Orthodox, Jewish, Irish, Polish, Italian, Albanian, Russian, Latino, Mexican, and Caribbean communities. In terms of their transportation, the F train (IND Culver Line) runs along the western part of the neighborhood and stops at Church Avenue, Ditmas Avenue, and 18th Avenue. The Kensington branch of Brooklyn Public Library is one of the few places with Urdu, Yiddish, Chinese and Hebrew materials amongst its innumerable collections. It started life as a place to deposit borrowed books.The library founded as a deposit station in 1908 by the Mother’s Kindergarten Club of PS 134 and the Kensington Improvement League, Kensington quickly outgrew two locations before becoming a full-fledged branch on McDonald Avenue in 1912.

Dining in Kensington is a great experience that can be quite a lesson in international culture. Punjab, Bangla Desh and Afghanistan are proudly inscribed in restaurant names and many New Yorkers can be excused for not even knowing for what Jhinuk on McDonald Avenue stands for. The Kensington Stables is the only remaining stable that provide quality riding in Prospect Park. They have about 40 gentle and well-trained horses and ponies, a caring and responsive staff and some scenic and relaxing riding paths. Most often, Kensington goes to great lengths to be amongst the very best places to stay in Brooklyn.



This page is about Brooklyn. You can find a list of every city and hamlet on Long Island by visiting our Long Island towns section. This includes not only Brooklyn, but all of Queens, Suffolk and Nassau counties.





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